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By On April 18, 2018

Borren calls time on Netherlands career

3:17 PM ET

  • ESPNcricinfo staff

Netherlands captain Peter Borren, 34, has retired from international cricket with immediate effect. Pieter Seelaar, the 30-year-old bowler, will take over the captaincy as Netherlands look to build towards the 2020 World T20 qualifiers and the ICC ODI Championships.

Jeroen Smits, the former Netherlands wicketkeeper, has been appointed the new team manager.

The Royal Dutch Cricket Association (KNCB) paid tribute via a press release issued on Wednesday evening, but that did not give him the chance to announce the news himself, Borren said in a tweet.

Borren last featured for Netherlands in the World Cup Qualifiers in Zimbabwe in March, where he could manage just 52 runs in six innings. Netherlands finished the tournament with one win in four matches and failed to qualify for the Super Sixes stage.

Borren retired with 58 ODIs and 43 T20I caps during the course of a 12-year international career. His replacement, Seelaar, debuted in 2006, the same year as Borren, and has represented Netherlands in 37 ODIs and 39 T20Is.

The KNCB said of Borren: "Peter Borren has been of tremendous value to the Dutch team, leading the national side over the last nine years.

"He has seen the Netherlands team grow into a much more professional set-up resulting in winning the World Cricket League and qualifying for the ODI Championships in December 2017. With his inspirational leadership, Peter has played a more than important role in this success."

Source: Google News Netherlands | Netizen 24 Netherlands

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By On April 18, 2018

T-Mobile Thuis reaches 200000 in the Netherlands

In the Netherlands, T-Mobile Thuis (Home) has reached the milestone of 200,000 customers.

With T-Mobile Home, T-Mobile offers customers a complete range of Internet, Fixed Calls and TV. Yesterday, the 200,000th customer, Mrs. Mastenbroek from Amsterdam, was personally honoured by Onno Halsema, director of T-Mobile Thuis. The customer received a cheque from T-Mobile from Halsema and therefore does not have to pay a subscription fee for its all-in-one package for one year.

“We are extremely proud of this result,” said Halsema.

“The team has worked extremely hard to achieve this goal, but we are far from it: 200,000 T-Mobile Home customers are just the beginning for us. The current growth in the number of customers is mainly due to the Mobile+Home advantag e in which fixed and mobile services are combined and customers receive a discount. This part of the market is also currently dominated by the two major players, KPN and VodafoneZiggo. It is essential that we are able to grow further in the short term in order to increase our market share and thereby compete with the duopoly.”

In December 2016, T-Mobile acquired Vodafone Thuis (Home). The rebranding was realised in February 2017. Last December, T-Mobile also acquired the Tele2 operations in the country. As a result, T-Mobile now has three differenct TV offers, including the OTT Knippr service, which will be terminated on June 1, 2018.

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Source: Google News Netherlands | Netizen 24 Netherlands

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By On April 18, 2018

Netherlands anonymous tip line sells anonymous tips: report

Netherlands anonymous tip line sells anonymous tips: report By Janene Pieters on April 18, 2018 - 07:37

The Netherlands' anonymous tip line Meld Misdaad Anoniem does not only pass tips on to the police, but also sells them to other parties. This makes the foundation around half a million euros per year, De Groene Amsterdammer reports based on its own research.

The tips are mostly sold to municipalities, but also to insurers, energy companies and even the Tax Authority, according to the weekly magazine. These customers pay the tip line a fixed monthly amount, and an amount per tip.

According to Titus Visser, director of the foundation behind the tip line, they have no other choice. "We are forced to look for money", he said. The foundation receives 1.1 million euros annually from the government, but its costs are around 1.6 million euros, according t o Visser. "We have to scrape the rest together."

The tips are sold to "parties that also want to contribute to tackling crime", Visser said. "The police can not do it alone, other parties are also needed." He thinks it is important for municipalities to have an 'independent information position'. "That way they can also contribute to tackling serious crime from their administrative perspective", Visser said. "We can help them by giving that information. I think that's great."

A number of experts expressed their concern about this practice to De Groene Amsterdammer. "Meld Misdaad Anoniem is commercializing criminal detection", criminal lawyer Jan Boone, whose been fighting against the anonymous tip line since its opening in 2003, said. "That is completely unacceptable.

Professor Gerrit-Jan Zwenne fears that this practice puts the reliability of the tips at risk. "Perverse incenti ves may arise in order to make the product as attractive as possible. So there is a risk that less attention will be paid to certain guarantees."

Professor Henny Sackers of Radboud University Nijmegen called the selling of tips an "undesirable revenue model" that comes at the expense of quality. "It is now simply about money, and then perhaps the less reliable tips are also passed on, because there is a contract."

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Source: Google News Netherlands | Netizen 24 Netherlands

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By On April 18, 2018

The Netherlands Bans Public Cannabis Consumption

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The Netherlands Bans Public Cannabis Consumption in This City Centre

Controversy over public cannabis consumption is brewing again in the Netherlands. This time, however, it’s not the nation’s famed “coffee shops” that are in hot water. Rather, it’s their noisy English-speaking clientele, who’ve apparently been annoying enough to prompt one city to take action. Responding to mounting complaints from residents, The Hague has put the kibosh on public smoking in its most popular areas. And as the Netherlands bans public cannabis consumption in this city centre, a popular tourist destination, other municipalities are considering the same.

Goodbye to Gedoogbeleid?

Over the years, the Netherland s has earned a reputation as one of the most drug-friendly nations on the planet. That’s because, despite its illegality, official policy openly tolerates cannabis use, possession and trade.

That policy goes by the name gedoogbeleid; literally, a “tolerance policy.” The Netherlands’ Opium Law divides drugs into two classes, hard and soft. Soft drugs, like marijuana, hash and sedatives fall under gedoogbeleid. Hard drugs do not, and the Netherlands aggressively prosecutes their trade and consumption.

The open “tolerance policy” toward cannabis spawned an entire national economy of “coffee shops.” These establishments operate in a kind of grey area of the law. They can sell cannabis, and customers can consume the drug on the premises. But coffee shops just can’t produce the marijuana they sell.

Rarely frequented by local residents, coffee shops and gedoogbeleid are major tourist magnets, drawing thousands of visitors an nually. The Netherlands has nearly 600 such shops, which reside in more than a quarter of all cities.

Officials in many of those cities have attempted to restrict the loose rules governing coffee shops. Their reasons are always similar. Tourists are getting too high, getting rowdy, and becoming a public nuisance.

In 2013, for example, the law changed to allow only Dutch residents to visit coffee shops. But the move drew sharp criticism from many cities.

Residents feared the residency requirement would tank the tourism industry bringing revenue into their cities. Ultimately, the laws ended up applying to just three cities.

Faced with the unpopularity of restricting the coffee shop economy, Dutch officials are going for a different approach. They want to ban public smoking in an effort to keep noisy, stoned tourists of the streets.

Tourists Beware: No More Public Smoking in The Hague

Cannabis-related public disturbances are on the rise in The Hague, the third largest city in the Netherlands. As a result, the city is experimenting with a two-year ban on public cannabis smoking in key areas.

The public consumption ban specifically impacts The Hague’s city centre, its central railway station, and all major shopping areas. In total, public cannabis use is prohibited in 13 public areas. These 13 areas are already subject to a ban on public alcohol consumption.

At first, politicians in The Hague wanted a city-wide ban on public cannabis consumption. Ultimately, however, they decided to target particularly high-traffic areas.

Police will enforce the ban and issue warning citations to anyone in violation of the new rules. Multiple violations carry the risk of a fine.

The Guardian reports that police will station themselves outside the doors of popular coffee shops to make sure no one leaves the premises with a lit joint.

The ban will stay in effect for two yea rs, at which point city officials will re-evaluate the situation.

The Final Hit: The Netherlands Bans Public Cannabis Consumption in This City Centre

A spokesperson for Hague mayor Pauline Krikee said the ban was a response to “many complaints from residents and visitors” regarding the odor of cannabis smoke and the disturbances from cannabis users.”

“The mayor and police decided the use of soft drugs has a negative impact on the living environment,” the spokesperson added.

While other popular coffee shop cities in the Netherlands, like Amsterdam and Rotterdam, have banned public smoking near schools and playgrounds, The Hague is the first city to ban public consumption in a city centre or shopping district.

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Source: Google News Netherlands | Netizen 24 Netherlands